Claire Chase at The Rotunda

I just got in from the Claire Chase concert presented by Bowerbird at The Rotunda here in Philadelphia. This was fantastic playing, a program of nearly continuous music lasting some 75 minutes, without intermission. Given the taxing nature of the evening, it was a feat of stamina, but her careful shaping of the music, and the light-footed precision of her rhythm made it more than an athletic event.

All the pieces save one involved pre-recorded sound. The evening began with a brief overture for electronic sound alone, Gradient Density by Du Yun. I have to admit that I enjoyed the playing more than the compositions, which offered one take or another on a minimalist viewpoint, including the cheerful dance of Reich’s Vermont Counterpoint (curious how, when all the multi-tracked flutes get going, the sound takes on a percussive quality we associate with Reich’s music for actual percussion instruments); and the more austere patterns of Glass’s Piece in the Shape of a Square. The music of Marcos Balter and Mario Diaz de León was more concerned with atmosphere, mood and dramatic gesture than with steadily pulsed processes, but, like Glass and Reich, both composers were interested in working with multiples of the same material as played live by Chase. To me the electronic components of these pieces were not terribly impressive – the Balter was yet another piece that recalled the sound of the Echoplex effects popular many decades ago, while the sound palette of the Diaz de León gave me a flashback to the sounds of the ElectroComp 100 that I used in my first undergrad electronic music class back in the same period. I was held more by Alvin Lucier’s work, which came off as a kind of installation piece: isolated single tones on Chase’s array of differently sized flutes played against slowly drifting sine waves – single petals of a Calder mobile floating in a silver room of elastic dimensions.

The evening’s closer, the only piece without electronics (sort of) was the classic Density 21.5 by Varèse. I say “sort of” because the flute was lightly amplified and reverberated, making for the best key pops I’ve ever heard in this piece. Chase brought to the piece, after more than an hour of punishing playing, a diabolic intensity that recalled the performance I heard Harvey Sollberger give at the very first new music concert I attended in NYC. When I heard Harvey, I got a sense of what the level of performance among New York players could be; that exalted level lives on.

Composers and their fees

Maybe Surely I am naive about this, but I was astounded by the fees that Glass and Reich are said to command in this post. Ned Rorem used to be considered outrageous for insisting on a fee to attend performances of his music, but the scale of the fees quoted is quite a different matter.

George Rochberg used to tell us that, “If money corrupts, you [composers] are incorruptible.” I am not saying Glass and Reich are corrupt! Nor am I saying that their fees are undeserved. But there does seem to be less of a distance between them and $$ than is the case for many composers, including some pretty famous ones.

Upcoming in Philly and NYC

– March 18 – soprano Mary MacKenzie (of SongFusion) performs with Shuffle Concert this Friday, March 18 at Baruch College. It’s a nice idea – the audience picks the program on the spot!

-March 19 and 20 – Orchestra 2001 plays Hindemith, Berio and Roberto Sierra. Julianne Baird, soprano; Marcantonio Barone, piano, Lori Barnett, cello are featured. The performance on the 19th is at the Trinity Center in Center City, Philadelphia, on the 20th at Swarthmore College.

– March 22 – the Philadelphia chapter of the American Composers Forum presents a webcast interview with George Crumb at 7 PM. Audio trailer here.

– March 29 – Penn Contemporary Music presents violinist Maria Bachman and pianist Jon Klibonoff at Penn’s Amado Recital Hall in Irvine Auditorium, 34th and Spruce Street. Program includes Glass: Sonata No. 1; Paul Moravec: Three Pieces; George Rochberg: Sonata; and the first performance of a new work by Penn faculty composer Jay Reise, The Flight of the Red Sea Swallow. The Glass and Moravec works are Philadelphia premieres. The late George Rochberg was, of course, a long-time Penn faculty member, and he wrote his sonata for Bachman.

– April 12 – looking a little ahead, the Curtis Symphony Orchestra will perform Messiaen’s Turangalila Symphony at the Kimmel Center, Christoph Eschenbach conducting, with Di Wu, piano and Thomas Bloch, ondes Martenot.

Balmy Friday Miscellany

– PennSound (which sounds like it should be a music site at Penn, but is actually mostly a spoken word archive) has links to Robert Ashley’s big interview project Music with Roots in the Aether. Included are interviews with and music by Glass, Lucier, Riley, Oliveros, Mumma, Behrman, and Ashley himself.

– Marilyn Nonken’s program from Poisson Rouge last November is available for streaming here. It includes “The People United…” with a cadenza written by Ethan Iverson.