All Alone

Daniel Felsenfeld had a fine idea on Twitter, inviting composers to list their works for solo performers – an obvious resource for a time of pandemic when we are staying home. I listed my relevant pieces there, but would like to mention there here as well.

There are three solo piano pieces in my catalog. The oldest is Secret Geometry, the same as the name for this blog. This is a piece with pre-recorded electronic sound, what kids these days would call “fixed media” and what I have to stop myself from calling “tape” even though that’s the medium I used at the time to record my MIDI realization of the electronic component. I wrote the piece for the brilliant Aleck Karis, perhaps the pianist I heard most frequently when attending new music concerts during my Columbia days. Aleck is a long time faculty member at UC San Diego. This was the first piece of mine to appear on CD but the label on which it appeared – CRI (Composers Recordings Inc.) no longer exists. However, New World Records has the CRI catalog, and lists a lot of CRI items on its website – not sure how complete the listing is. The album with Secret Geometry is not easy to find on the website; if you search for “primosch” you will only get the all-Primosch cd Icons, which was recorded after Aleck’s album. Despite being an album of pieces for piano and electronic sound, it doesn’t come up when you filter the CRI catalog for electronic music. However, a search for “aleck  karis” will finally yield this page which features sound clips of my piece.

There are two more recent piano pieces. I wrote a big Sonata-Fantasia on a commission from Lambert Orkis who wanted a piece involving both a piano and a Kurzweil synthesizer. Since I knew it was extremely unlikely anyone else would play the piece (for one thing, that model of Kurz was out of production before I finished the piece), I planned on making a portion of the piece work for solo piano. The first movement is a substantial variation set, running about 24 minutes, and it is available from Presser as Piano Variations. The idea of the original version was that ghosts of the piano’s past would be evoked in some of the variations. For example, there is one that refers to Schubert that uses fortepiano samples; a canon with a third free voice – a texture that recalls the Goldberg Variations – uses a harpsichord sample. However, most of the variations employ a more wide-ranging palette of electronic sounds and do not refer to earlier styles. In the piano solo version, earlier keyboard idioms are evoked simply by texture and keyboard layout. You might say the piece becomes variations of the piano as well as variations for piano, though I suppose every substantial variation set does that to some extent. Lambert recorded the entire Sonata for Bridge in its original version, but the piano solo version awaits a first recording. (You should check out the Wernick Sonata #2 on that Bridge album – Dick is a truly under-appreciated master.) Here is a handsomely made video of Anna Kislitsyna’s brilliant performance of the Piano Variations:

While there is presently no CD of the Piano Variations, a second recording of Pure Contraption, Absolute Gift is forthcoming.  This set of five short character pieces or preludes, running about 14 minutes, was recorded for Centaur by the wonderful Youmee Kim; here’s the second movement:

Ryan McCullough has recorded the piece for an Albany disc that I anticipate will be coming out in the next several months. (UPDATE: It comes out May 15!) It includes some songs of mine as well as music of John Harbison. Ryan’s wife Lucy Fitz Gibbon is the soprano on the album, and the performances are fantastic throughout.

I wrote Pure Contraption, Absolute Gift (the title comes from an Auden poem) for a consortium of 12 pianists. Check out a substantial post on the piece here, including score excerpts.

My other solo pieces are early works. There are two pieces with electronic sound: Particles for clarinet, and Aria for oboe. In both cases the electronic component needs some technological attention, so if you are interested, let me know, and I will work on getting together something that is presentable. No electronics are required for my solo violin Variations. Aria is available from what is now called Wise Music Classical. Originally published by Gunther Schuller’s Margun firm, the pieces went to Associated Music (the BMI sibling of G. Schirmer) when Gunther sold the business. Presently, Associated is under the Wise Music Classical umbrella. Wise, unlike Associated, identifies the pieces as being under the Margun imprint, instead of simply being absorbed into Associated. I believe the violin Variations were also in the Margun catalog, but they are not listed on my page at Wise; I will look into that. For the moment be in touch with me if you are interested in a score of the Variations or in Particles.

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